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Walter Sondheim Fountain

The fountain at West Shore Park was named after Walter Sondheim, Jr. — a Baltimore leader known for his role as president of the Baltimore City School Board. He sought to end racially segregated schools & had a pivotal role in the transformation of downtown.

Inner Harbor Finger Piers

Step off the promenade & meander to the end of the finger piers for the perfect spot for selfies and panorama photos! These finger piers also host sightseeing boats and transient docking spaces for anyone visiting by boat.

Inner Harbor Amphitheater

The Inner Harbor Amphitheater is a family-friendly venue that welcomes you to the Harbor. The Amphitheater hosts street performers & is home to some iconic views of the water.

Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse

Built in 1855, the Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse is the oldest screw-pile lighthouse in Maryland. Most of the structure was fabricated in Baltimore at the Murray and Hazelhurst iron foundry & before it was relocated to the Inner Harbor as a museum exhibit.

Mr. Trash Wheel

Mr. Trash Wheel is one of four sustainably powered trash interceptors in the Baltimore harbor. Powered by the rivers’ current the devices remove trash from outflows from several rivers as they empty into the harbor. 

Harbor East Promenade

Stop anywhere along the Harbor East Promenade to take in the breathtaking views and snap your picture. From the promenade you can also snap a photo of the iconic Domino Sugar sign across the Harbor.

Harbor Point Center Plaza

Harbor Point is Central Plaza is a primary hub of activity for the neighborhood that continues to grow. The plaza is an event space & open air park for all to enjoy, offering waterfront views – the perfect background to your photos!

Will's Park

A courtyard that connects Wills Wharf, Thames Street Wharf, and 1405 Point transitions down to the promenade with sculpted landforms and a grassy slope that’s perfect for sitting and the best shots of the iconic Domino Sugar sign just across the water.

Sandlot

Sandlot is a harborfront oasis for outdoor dining, recreation, live performances, and community events. The brightly colored containers, abundance of sand, & views of the harbor create a relaxed, beach-like atmosphere perfect for all ages. 

Will's Wharf

Bond Street Wharf

Along Fell’s Point’s cobblestone streets, old saloons, and countless boats – many still carry goods to harbor-side warehouses such as Bond Street Wharf. “Bond Street Wharf” was painted on the exterior wall, providing a highly recognizable landmark.

Broadway Pier

Broadway Pier currently serves visiting towboats, classic sailing vessels, and Coast Guard and Navy ships. Earlier wharves at this location served ferries from other parts of the harbor.

Walter Sondheim Fountain

Walter Sondheim, Jr. was a longtime Baltimore business executive and civic leader best known for his role as president of the Baltimore City School Board where he sought to put an end to racially segregated Baltimore City schools. He also had a pivotal role in the revival of downtown Baltimore and transforming downtown and the Inner Harbor into models of urban renaissance. It’s fitting that this interactive water fountain at West Shore Park, Baltimore’s most prominent waterfront park, is named in his honor. (Fountain operates seasonally Spring – Fall).

Inner Harbor Finger Piers 

Step off the promenade and meander to the end of the finger piers for spectacular views of the Inner Harbor – the perfect spot for selfies and panorama photos! These finger piers also host sightseeing boats and transient docking spaces for anyone visiting by boat.

Inner Harbor Amphitheater

The Inner Harbor Amphitheater is a family-friendly venue that welcomes you to the Harbor. The Amphitheater hosts street performers & is home to some iconic views of the water.

Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse

Initially built in 1855 and located atop Seven Foot Knoll in the Chesapeake Bay, the Seven Foot Knoll Lighthouse is the oldest screw-pile lighthouse in Maryland. Most parts of the structure were fabricated in Baltimore at the Murray and Hazelhurst iron foundry. The lighthouse was replaced by a modern navigational aid and was relocated to Baltimore’s Inner Harbor as a museum exhibit. Climb the steps to see an extensive exhibit of artifacts and information on lighthouses around the Chesapeake region.

Mr. Trash Wheel

Mr. Trash Wheel is one of three sustainably powered trash interceptors in the Baltimore harbor collecting trash as it enters the harbor. The devices remove trash from outflows from several rivers as they empty into the harbor.  The rivers’ current provides power to turn the water wheel, which lifts trash and debris from the water and deposits it into a dumpster barge. When there isn’t enough water current, a solar panel array provides additional power to keep the machine running. When the dumpster is full, it’s towed away by boat, and a new dumpster is put in place.

Harbor East Promenade

Looking for the perfect selfie spot to capture our beautiful Inner Harbor in the background? Stop anywhere along the Harbor East Promenade to take in the breathtaking views and snap your picture. 

Harbor Point Central Plaza

Located at the heart of Harbor Point, the Central Plaza is a primary hub of activity for the bustling neighborhood that continues to grow around it. Approximately 1.5 acres total, the Central Plaza serves as an activated event space and open air park for all of Baltimore to enjoy. The Central Plaza offers spectacular waterfront views of the Inner Harbor – the perfect background to your photos!

Wills Park

Wills Park is a unique waterfront gem. A courtyard that connects Wills Wharf, Thames Street Wharf, and 1405 Point transitions down to the promenade with sculpted landforms and a grassy slope that’s perfect for sitting and taking in the harbor views. You’ll want to pull out your camera here for the best shots of the iconic Domino Sugar sign just across the water.

Sandlot

Sandlot is a harbor front oasis for outdoor dining, recreation, live performances, family-friendly games, and community events. The brightly colored containers, abundance of sand, and breathtaking views of the harbor create a relaxed, beach-like atmosphere perfect for all ages. Sandlot is an ultimately temporary creation until Harbor Point Park is completed so grab your photos here while you can!

Will’s Wharf

Bond Street Wharf

Fells Point, one of Baltimore’s oldest neighborhoods, began as a bustling shipbuilding and shipping center in colonial America and is today experiencing a revival. The area retains its charm with cobblestone streets, old saloons, and countless boats – many still carrying goods to harbor-side warehouses such as Bond Street Wharf. “Bond Street Wharf” was painted on the exterior wall, providing a highly recognizable landmark.

Broadway Pier

Broadway Pier currently serves visiting towboats, classic sailing vessels, and Coast Guard and Navy ships. Earlier wharves at this location served ferries from other parts of the harbor, including Locust Point, which was a point of entry for immigrants.

Pride of Baltimore Memorial

This memorial displays the characteristic raked mast of a Pride of Baltimore, along with the names carved into pink granite of those lost at sea after being struck by a freak squall off Puerto Rico in 1986.

Easy Landing Sculpture

The sculpture “Easy Landing” was designed by Kenneth Snelson in 1978 and sits at the entrance to the Maryland Science Center is constructed of stainless steel tubes strung together with tension cables atop three concrete pillars. 

Triaxial Link by William Niebauer

The curved concrete sculptures in front of the Baltimore Visitor Center created by Baltimore area artist William Niebauer seek a common purpose – to explore and discover Baltimore. 

William Donald Schaefer Statue

William Donald Schaefer served as Baltimore Mayor & Governor of Maryland. He was remembered for being a caring public servant & presided over much of the Inner Harbor’s renaissance.

McKeldin Square

McKeldin Square was named after two-time Baltimore Mayor, Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin & hosts a central misting fountain and historical markers championing civil rights and development throughout the city.

Inner Harbor Project Code of Conduct Heart

This teal heart, designed by Ashton Design, reminds everyone “Respect Starts in the Heart,” & represents the Inner Harbor Project’s Code of Conduct: to lessen tensions, heighten trust, & build a stronger Baltimore community.

9/11 Memorial of Maryland

The 9/11 Memorial of Maryland at Baltimore’s World Trade Center designed by firm, Ziger/Snead, honors the heroism, commitment and sacrifice of Maryland’s 9/11 victims, rescuers, first responders and their families. 

Kawasaki Stone Lantern Garden

The Kawasaki Stone Lantern was donated to Baltimore by its sister city Kawasaki, Japan. The design of the new garden was by Mahan Rykiel Associates, with construction by Rooted in Nature and Hilgartner Natural Stone Company.

Under Sky / One Family, by Mark di Suvero

This piece was constructed in 1980 by Mark di Suvero.  The title was taken from a Chinese saying, but also references Martin Luther King’s belief: “one people, living together, working together, playing together.”

“Susquehanna Dam Jumper” Fish Sculpture

This sculpture is located on the bridge between Piers 3 and 4 and features a fish wrapped in copper wire. This was one of 200 uniquely designed fish that were installed all around Baltimore City as part of a public art exhibit in 2001. 

Pierce's Park

Pierce’s Park invites kids (and adults!) to play and enjoy nature. Funded with help from the family of local businessman Pierce Flanigan III, the design weaves together Pierce’s passion for nature, music, language, and children. 

Pier 5 Metal Bird

Baltimore artist Michael Metcalf created this piece in 2015, from a birdcage that was in his family for 88 years. The sculpture also  highlights the number 52 in celebration of Baltimore Ravens’ linebacker Ray Lewis.

National Katyń Memorial Park

The National Katyń Memorial in Harbor East memorializes the victims of the 1940 Katyn massacre of Polish nationals carried out by Soviet forces. The monument, sculpted by Andrzej Pitynski, stands 56 feet tall!

Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park

This bronze sculpture of revered author, diplomat and journalist Frederick Douglass by Marc Andre Robinson, is located very near to where Douglass worked on the docks before escaping to freedom in New York.

Zelda Zen Sculpture by Steve Baker

This whimsical sculpture was made by local Hampden artist, Steve Baker of Wholly Terra. If you catch it just right, the sun illuminates the colorful stained glass bubbles and brings the sculpture to life.  

Pride of Baltimore Memorial

The Pride of Baltimore was a reproduction of an early 19th-century “Baltimore Clipper” topsail schooner commissioned by Baltimore City in the 1970’s as an icon to link downtown Baltimore to its harbor. The West Shore of the Inner Harbor was transformed into an open-air shipyard where the ship was built. Pride of Baltimore was launched on February 27, 1977 and spent 9 years at sea as a goodwill ambassador to the world. The ship visited ports along the Eastern Seaboard, the Great Lakes, the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, West Coast of America and European ports in the Irish Sea, the North Sea, the Baltic Sea, the English Channel, and the Mediterranean. The ship was struck by a freak squall and tragically sunk off the coast of Puerto Rico in 1986. This memorial was built and dedicated to the memory of the members of the clipper ship crew lost at sea. The memorial consists of the characteristic raked mast of a Baltimore Clipper, along with the names of those lost in the tragedy carved into pink granite.

Easy Landing Sculpture

The sculpture “Easy Landing” at the entrance to the Maryland Science Center is constructed of stainless steel tubes strung together with tension cables. The entire sculpture balances atop three concrete pillars. Commissioned by the City of Baltimore and designed by Kenneth Snelson, the sculpture was dedicated on January 29, 1978.

Triaxial Link by William Niebauer 

The curved concrete sculptures in front of the Baltimore Visitor Center were created by Baltimore area artist William Niebauer. The three arcs reference the varied points and directions from which visitors to Baltimore travel, while seeking a common purpose – to explore and discover Baltimore. Each of the arcs are identical in form, materials, and dimensions, but differ slightly in color. The arcs if put together form a full circle that can represent tourism and human interaction. As visitors obtain information, embark on journeys of discovery, make connections, and finally return to their home base, a cyclical relationship is created. It is our hope that visitors enjoy their time in Charm City and return again and again. The arc of the sculptures also complement the curved roofline and raw materials of the visitor center while remaining peripheral to the building’s contemporary grandeur. Each arc weighs 4,000 pounds and measures 18 inches wide, the average shoulder-width of a human.

William Donald Schaefer Statue

William Donald Schaefer served as Baltimore Mayor from 1971-1987 and was the Governor of Maryland from 1987-1995. He presided over much of the Inner Harbor’s renaissance and was well known as a “man of the people.” Mayor Schaefer is remembered for his sense of caring as a public servant and his ability to get things done in his remarkable career as Baltimore City mayor, Maryland’s governor, and its comptroller.

McKeldin Square

McKeldin Square is a unique 2.5 acre park situated between Pratt St. and Light St. in the heart of the city. The plaza was named after two-time Baltimore Mayor, Theodore Roosevelt McKeldin who served as Mayor from  1943 to 1947 and again from 1963 to 1967. McKeldin Plaza is an open space with a central misting fountain and historical markers elaborating on McKeldin’s history as a champion for civil rights and development throughout the city.

Inner Harbor Project Code of Conduct Heart

This teal heart, designed by Baltimore’s own Ashton Design, not only visually reminds everyone who enjoys the waterfront that “Respect Starts in the Heart,” but it also represents the Inner Harbor Project’s Code of Conduct that all of Baltimore should exhibit to lessen tensions, heighten trust, and build a stronger Baltimore community.

9/11 Memorial of Maryland

Dedicated on September 11, 2011, the 9/11 Memorial of Maryland at Baltimore’s World Trade Center honors the extraordinary heroism, commitment and sacrifice of Maryland’s 9/11 victims, rescuers, first responders and their families. The memorial was designed by Baltimore architecture firm, Ziger/Snead.

Kawasaki Stone Lantern Garden

The Kawasaki Stone Lantern is a gift donated to Baltimore by its sister city of Kawasaki, Japan. It was originally installed in June 1984 at Rash Field, but was relocated to its current position in early 2020. The design of the new lantern garden was completed by Mahan Rykiel Associates, with construction by Rooted in Nature and Hilgartner Natural Stone Company.

Under Sky / One Family, by Mark di Suvero

Mark di Suvero was considered one of the nation’s leading sculptors when he built this piece in 1980.  The title of the piece was taken from a Chinese saying di Suvero remembered from his childhood, but it also makes reference to Martin Luther King’s belief in “one people, living together, working together, playing together,” ideas he hoped his sculpture might also evoke. Other references in the work are to Baltimore’s history as a maritime and steel center. The vertical steel elements and his dramatic arrangement of them conjure up the mast of the ship, and his inclusion of an actual propeller from a large ship, meant for children’s play here, underscores Baltimore’s seafaring history.

“Susquehanna Dam Jumper” Fish Sculpture

This sculpture is located on the bridge between Piers 3 and 4 and features a fish wrapped in copper wire. The sculpture is 6 feet long, 3 feet high, and 1 foot wide and the entire piece (base included) weighs over 1200 lbs!. This was one of 200 uniquely designed fish that were installed all around Baltimore City as part of a public art exhibit in 2001. Several of the fish sculptures were auctioned off with proceeds funding various city-wide charities.

Pierce’s Park 

Pierce’s Park is a hidden gem that invites kids (and adults!) to play and enjoy nature. Funded with help from the family of local businessman Pierce Flanigan III, for whom the park is named, the design weaves together Pierce’s passion for nature, music, language, and children. Play elements include a musical fence and horn sculpture both designed by local artist and sculptor David Hess, and a live willow tunnel to run through. Look to the ground and you’ll be mesmerized by the homophones etched into the brick walkways.

Pier 5 Metal Bird

Created in 2015 and made entirely made out of trash by local Baltimore artist Michael Metcalf who works out of the Phoenix Art Yard.  An entire birdcage that was in his family for 88 years is used as part of the bird along with the number 52, which was placed on the sculpture in celebration of Baltimore Ravens’ linebacker Ray Lewis.

National Katyń Memorial Park

The National Katyń Memorial in Harbor East memorializes the victims of the 1940 Katyn massacre of Polish nationals carried out by Soviet forces. Baltimore’s Polish-American community was instrumental in having the monument built. The monument, sculpted by Andrzej Pitynski, stands 56 feet tall!

Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park

Frederick Douglass was born a slave in 1818 and was sent from Eastern Shore plantations to Baltimore around the age of 8 to be a house servant. When he was 20 years old, he fled Baltimore to freedom, and became a revered author, diplomat and journalist dedicated to freeing slaves, fighting for equal rights for people of color and women, and for the acceptance of immigrants. This bronze sculpture by Marc Andre Robinson, a graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore, stands 6 feet tall and wide, weighs 1,100 lbs, and is located very near to where Douglass worked on the docks before escaping to freedom in New York.

Zelda Zen Sculpture by Steve Baker

This whimsical sculpture will surely make anyone smile. If you catch it just right, the sun illuminates the colorful stained glass bubbles and brings the sculpture to life.  This metal sculpture was made by local Hampden artist, Steve Baker of Wholly Terra.

Paint Your Rash Field Park: Community Art Project

The 500+ ft. of construction fence at the future location of Rash Field Park is lined with colorful banners painted by various community members as part of a public art project named, “Paint Your Rash Field Park.”

Living Classrooms Mural

This mural visually represents Living Classrooms’ mission of building strong, equitable, and sustainable communities and shows that the future of our communities is best attained by youth inspiration.

Living Classrooms Mural - Lancaster St. Canal Side

These murals were painted by Kathleen Patricia Durkin, Noah Smock, and Living Classrooms volunteers & highlight the mission and values of the Living Classroom Foundation.

H&S Bakery Mural by Bridget Cimino

This 2 sided Mural was painted for Baltimore’s H&S Bakery for their 75th Anniversary and highlights of the process of bread making.

Mural by Nelson Rivas aka Cekis

A teal and blue checkered floor which represents the water of the harbor is lined with row houses and buildings, by Chilean artist Nelson Rivas aka, Cekis — a pioneer of the Latin American street art movement.

Fells Point Mural By Kerry Cesen

Illustrator/graphic designer Kerry Cesen‘s mural of two hands holding a historic Fell’s Point captured in a bottle shows us that the people of Baltimore are the ones shaping the city today. 

Skateboarding Mural by Michael Owen

This colorful skateboarding mural on the side of Johnny Rads was commissioned by PBR in 2008 and painted by renowned Baltimore street artist, Michael Owen. 

‘Shop Small’ Mural by Stefan Ways

This bright blue fish nestled under a red tugboat mural by Stefan Ways was inspired by fishing and supporting small business. It was painted in 2013, promoting the Shop Small initiative of American Express. 

Black Lives Matter Art Installation by Loring Cornish

Known for his distinctive glass mosaics, self-taught artist Loring Cornish’s Black Lives Matter installation remains up year-round outside his studio, How Great Thou Art, on Thames Street.

Paint Your Rash Field Park: Community Art Project

Rash Field is currently being transformed into a safe and central place for families city-wide to explore, learn, and play. The 500+ ft. of construction fence on the Waterfront Promenade outlining the construction area will be lined with colorful banners painted by various youth groups, organizations and individuals as part of a public art project named, “Paint Your Rash Field Park.”

Living Classrooms Mural

This large mural is best viewed while standing on the Central Avenue bridge, between Harbor East and Harbor Point. This mural visually represents Living Classrooms’ mission of building strong, equitable, and sustainable communities and shows that the future of our communities is best attained by youth inspiration. Look close and you’ll notice that the silhouette contains the city skyline, open space, and other icons of Baltimore. The open book represents education as the silhouette blows wind into the sails of the boat that is sailing to new horizons. The boat is from the original boat that was a founding element of the school and used by Living Classrooms to teach sailing to youth. This mural was painted by Baltimore based Mural Masters, Inc.

Living Classrooms Mural – Lancaster St. Canal Side

This mural is hidden but once you find it, you’ll be glad you did! The mural can only be viewed while standing outside of Whole Foods on the Lancaster St. promenade. Look across the canal and just under the base of the large wooden tower and you’ll see a series of smaller murals. These murals were painted by Kathleen Patricia Durkin, Noah Smock, and Living Classrooms volunteers in 2009, highlighting the mission and values of the Living Classroom Foundation.

H&S Bakery Mural by Bridget Cimino

The H&S Family of Bakeries including H&S Bakery, Northeast Foods, and Schmidt Baking Company together make up America’s largest family-owned variety baker, proudly providing specialty baked goods to major industry retailers and small businesses in the United States. This 2 sided Mural was painted for Baltimore’s H&S Bakery for their 75th Anniversary and highlights of the process of bread making.

Mural by Nelson Rivas aka Cekis  

A teal and blue checkered floor which represents the water of the harbor is lined with row houses and buildings. It was painted in 2008 by Chilean artist Nelson Rivas aka, Cekis. Cekis is one of the pioneers of the Latin American street art movement.

Fells Point Mural By Kerry Cesen

Illustrator/graphic designer Kerry Cesen‘s mural of two hands holding a historic Fell’s Point captured in a bottle shows us that the people of Baltimore are the ones shaping the city today.  In the mural, the left hand is holding a long, sharp object which is poised to create gentle waves in the harbor or to wreck havoc in the town. Just like the hands hold the future for the town in the mural, people hold the future for their own cities.

Skateboarding Mural by Michael Owen

This colorful skateboarding mural was commissioned by PBR in 2008 and painted by renowned Baltimore street artist, Michael Owen. The mural is on the side of Johnny Rads, a popular restaurant known for employing skaters.

‘Shop Small’ Mural by Stefan Ways

This bright blue fish nestled under a red tugboat mural was painted in 2013, promoting the Shop Small initiative of American Express. The artist, Stefan Ways, contacted several small business owners in Fell’s Point and ultimately worked with Tochterman’s Fishing Tackle on Eastern Ave.  Inspired by fishing and supporting small business, this mural illustrates a Maryland rockfish and a red tugboat, both representatives of the Harbor, the store and the Maryland state fish.

Black Lives Matter Art Installation by Loring Cornish

Known for his distinctive glass mosaics, self-taught artist Loring Cornish’s Black Lives Matter installation remains up year-round outside his studio, How Great Thou Art, on Thames Street.